Sewage Treatment Plant - Shubham Wastewater Treatment Plant

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Wastewater from households and industry, commonly together with water runoff from urban areas, is conveyed by the sewerage system to sewage treatment plantsfor safe and economic treatment of sewage, and treatment and disposal of the resulting sludge. Domestic wastewater will contain both solid and dissolved pollutants including faecal matter, paper, urine, sanitary items, food residues and a variety of other contaminants. The sewer network will usually also receive wastewaters from office and commercial properties and from industrial premises. Rainwater from roofs and roads may also drain into the sewer network. The combined flow from these various sources travels through the sewer system and ultimately to a 'sewage works' where it receives treatment before discharge of the treated effluent to a stream, river, estuary or the sea.

Why do we need to treat Sewage?

Treatment of sewage is essential to ensure that the receiving water into which the effluent is ultimately discharged is not significantly polluted. However, the degree of treatment required will vary according to the type of receiving water. Thus, a very high degree of treatment will be required if the effluent discharges to a fishery or upstream of an abstraction point for water supply. A lower level of treatment may be acceptable for discharges to coastal waters where there is rapid dilution and dispersion.

How do treatment plants protect our water?

Wastewater treatment plants: Remove solids, everything from rags and plastics to sand and smaller particles found in wastewater; Reduce organic matter and pollutants--naturally occurring helpful bacteria and other microorganisms consume organic matter in wastewater and are then separated from the water; and, Restore oxygen--the treatment process ensures that the water put back into our rivers or lakes has enough oxygen to support life.

What does Sewage Treatment involve?

Sewage treatment involves: The removal of solids by physical screening or sedimentation The removal of soluble and fine suspended organic pollutants by biological oxidation and adsorption processes. Both forms of treatment produce sludge as by-products and these have to be treated and used or disposed of in an economical and environmentally acceptable way. (See the description below on sludge treatment.)

Preliminary Treatment Screening Large solids (plastics, rag, toilet paper residues) are removed first by mechanical screens. Traditionally, screening was used to remove only large solid material (> 25-30mm) in order to protect downstream operations. Nowadays, much finer screens (6mm mesh) are commonly employed to remove smaller inert solids. The material retained ('screenings') is usually washed to remove faecal matter and then compressed for disposal to landfill or to an incinerator.

Grit removal At the next preliminary stage, fine mineral matter (grit and sand), originating mainly from road runoff, is allowed to deposit in long channels or circular traps. The retained solids are removed and usually sent to landfill for disposal. Storm water diversion channel At times of rainstorms, the flow of sewage into the works may be too high to be accommodated by the downstream treatment stages. In these circumstances, some of the flow may be diverted at this point to storm tanks where it is stored temporarily before returning it for treatment when the flow subsides. At times of rainstorms, the flow of sewage into the works may be too high to be accommodated by the downstream treatment stages.

In these circumstances, some of the flow may be diverted at this point to storm tanks where it is stored temporarily before returning it for treatment when the flow subsides. In extreme rainfall events an overflow of effluent from the storm tanks may pass directly to a watercourse. Where does wastewater come from? Homes--human and household wastes from toilets, sinks, baths, dishwashers, garbage grinders, clothes washers and drains. Industry, Schools, and Business--chemical and other wastes from factories, food-service operations, school activities, hospitals, shopping centers, etc. Storm Water Infiltration and Inflow from Runoff and Groundwater--water that enters the sanitary sewer system during a storm, as well as groundwater that enters through cracks in sewers. The City of Columbia has one set of sewers for wastewater from homes and businesses (sanitary sewers) and a separate system for storm water runoff.

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Shubham Underground Sewage Treatment Plant is ideal for small communities; apartment and condominium complexes where space is limited and aesthetics are a top concern. The Underground Sewage Treatment Plant arrives to the site fully assembled and ready for direct burial. All equipment and components are contained in the operator access hatch and completely out of view.

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Sewage Treatment Plant - Shubham Wastewater Treatment Plant

This article was published on 2011/04/20